To be reasonable, Grish does not declare that her book is any other thing more than the usual “fun dating guide. ”

To be reasonable, Grish does not declare that her book is any other thing more than the usual “fun dating guide. ”

She informs you at the start about“basic Jewish principles” or xmatch “extreme holiday traditions like Purim or Simchas Torah. So it won’t teach you” But specialists like Dr. Sandor Gardos, who’re prepared to place their complete names close to statements like, “Jewish guys will always more attentive, ” give the book the veneer of real self-help, and many Amazon reviewers indicate which they got it for advice whenever dating somebody Jewish.

Therefore. Harmless silliness? We don’t think therefore. The book could pique a non-Jew’s interest in finding out what the hell goes on at Purim and Simchas Torah on the upside. But beyond that, it just reinforces stereotypes—glib at the best, anti-Semitic at worst—that, ironically, anybody could dispel on their own by, um, dating a real Jew.

Sadder still, Boy Vey implies that not a good deal has changed since 1978. The Shikse’s Guide makes a distinctly more rigorous effort at wit, nevertheless the stereotypes are nevertheless the exact same: Jewish males as metrosexual mama’s guys that are neurotic yet providing between the sheets. The publications also share an exhausted yet meta-premise that is apparently unshakable “the Jews, they’re funny! Continue reading “To be reasonable, Grish does not declare that her book is any other thing more than the usual “fun dating guide. ””